10 million state pension forecasts viewed online since 2016 – how to check yours


How does the state pension work?

The state pension is paid to people over the state pension age who have made national insurance contributions for a certain amount of time (usually at least 10 years). 

How old you’ll need to be before you can claim your state pension and how much you’ll be eligible to receive will depend on several factors: 

  • When you were born.
  • Your gender.
  • How many years you’ve made national insurance contributions for.
  • Whether you’ve boosted your pension, for example by delaying when you’ll receive it or by making voluntary national insurance contributions.

If you’re a man born on or after 6 April 1951, or a woman born on or after 6 April 1953, you’ll get the new state pension, which currently pays a flat rate of up to £164.35 per week (which will be adjusted for inflation). You’ll need to have paid national insurance contributions for at least 35 qualifying years to get this headline rate.

If you’re a man born on or before 5 April 1951, or a woman born on or before 5 April 1953, you’ll get the old state pension, which currently pays a basic rate of up to £125.95 per week plus a possible additional rate of up to £160 per week (both figures will be adjusted for inflation). To get the full basic state pension, you’ll need to have paid national insurance contributions for at least 30 qualifying years.

 



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